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Peggy Guggenheim by Alice Tye for Printed Pages
Sep 27, 2014

Peggy Guggenheim by Alice Tye for Printed Pages

Aug 21, 2014 / 15 notes
Aug 21, 2014

"If our understanding of male genius is of near-autism — a mind that, rather like Spinoza’s God, neither needs nor loves us in return — then it is tempting to see Dumas as an exemplar of a heretofore all-but-unheralded form of genius, one specifically female. She’s open, giving, relational, fluid."

"We spent an hour or two there in the summertime’s prolonged gloaming, watching the light change upon the silvery rippling water, discussing the nature of white and unpainted plaster walls; the wide range of the color blue (truest, apparently, in forget-me-nots) and hoping for an experience of the “Purkinje effect” — so named after the 19th-century Czech scientist: “He was the first to observe that, with twilight, the warm colors — especially red — recede, implode,” Dumas said, “and the cool colors, the blues, begin to glow.”

Claire Messud on Marlene Dumas, T Magazine

design-is-fine:

Grit Kallin-Fischer, Pieces of Pottery and ceramics | Töpferarbeiten und Keramikwaren, 1930. Germany. Gelatin-silver print. Via LACMA
Aug 15, 2014 / 107 notes

design-is-fine:

Grit Kallin-Fischer, Pieces of Pottery and ceramics | Töpferarbeiten und Keramikwaren, 1930. Germany. Gelatin-silver print. Via LACMA

Constantin Brancusi, Mademoiselle Pogany II, c. 1919-20
Aug 15, 2014

Constantin Brancusi, Mademoiselle Pogany II, c. 1919-20

creaturesofcomfort:

Max Ernst at Peggy Guggenheim’s home, New York, fall 1942
photograph by Hermann Landshoff
Aug 15, 2014 / 79 notes

creaturesofcomfort:

Max Ernst at Peggy Guggenheim’s home, New York, fall 1942

photograph by Hermann Landshoff

museumuesum:

Roe Ethridge
Maya with Column, 2008
Aug 15, 2014 / 270 notes

museumuesum:

Roe Ethridge

Maya with Column, 2008

(via mindfragments)

breakfastineurope:

Desert Shore by Nico (1970)
Aug 15, 2014 / 27 notes

breakfastineurope:

Desert Shore by Nico (1970)

(via fiftyfortyninety)

AiA, August 2014
Aug 6, 2014 / 1 note

AiA, August 2014

osmaharvilahti:

Kukkapuro, Out of the Blue, Gestalten 2014
Collaborated with Nokia/Microsoft and shot Vuokko Nurmesniemi, Yrjö Kukkapuro, Kari Virtanen, Harri Koskinen, Eero Aarnio, Fujiwo Ishimoto and Marimekko for “Out of the Blue”, celebrating finnish desing and art. Published by Gestalten and out now. #gestalten #osmaharvilahti #finland#nokia #microsoft #book
Aug 6, 2014 / 142 notes

osmaharvilahti:

Kukkapuro, Out of the Blue, Gestalten 2014

Collaborated with Nokia/Microsoft and shot Vuokko Nurmesniemi, Yrjö Kukkapuro, Kari Virtanen, Harri Koskinen, Eero Aarnio, Fujiwo Ishimoto and Marimekko for “Out of the Blue”, celebrating finnish desing and art. Published by Gestalten and out now. #gestalten #osmaharvilahti #finland#nokia #microsoft #book

Aug 5, 2014 / 1 note

Peter Mendulsend: No, there’s nothing like a physical book, but that doesn’t eliminate the need for a digital book. It’s interesting—I taught a class recently at Sarah Lawrence College, and I got the chance to be among people younger than I am, to find out what the hell is going on with kids. So I asked them to talk to me about digital versus physical books, and the thing that I found incredible about that whole group of college-aged kids is not just that they read across media and platforms, but that they had very clear ideas about which was good for what. It wasn’t a question of one medium replacing another. Yes, of course e-books are great for traveling, text books … what I loved about it was that it wasn’t a binary equation. It’s more that they have this very sophisticated—I love how I’m talking about them as if they’re Martians, but of course, they are to me—

Christopher King: Well, Sarah Lawrence students—

BOMB, August 2014

Jul 30, 2014 / 1 note

Without skipping a beat, she said, “They tore down my wonderful studio there. They put a Chemical Bank in its place. I worked for thirteen years in that studio. A sailmaker’s loft, on Coenties Slip. It was right on the East River, so close I could see the expressions on the faces of the sailors. That’s when I was friends with Barney Newman. We’d talk about Picasso, who was a good painter because he worked hard. But he had a lot of goofy ideas. I liked Andy Warhol, but I was afraid to go visit him because of his friends. Barney would do wonderful talk with me. He’d say about painting, ‘It’s transcendent.’ A lot of people didn’t believe him. But I did. It has to be about life. Barney and the other Abstract Expressionists gave up defined space, and they gave up forms. They all liked my paintings. I feel as though I owe them a debt. Barney hung my shows. Too bad about Barney. The doctor told him to stop, to give it up. Because it’s hard work. So he gave it up, but he started again, and he died of a heart attack.” She drank another glass of water. “This water is so good,” she said again.

Agnes Martin, The New Yorker, July 2003

Christopher Williams, RITTERSPORT, 2009
Jul 30, 2014

Christopher Williams, RITTERSPORT, 2009

creaturesofcomfort:

Pina Bausch in Männer Vogue, c. 1984-1989
Jul 29, 2014 / 36 notes

creaturesofcomfort:

Pina Bausch in Männer Vogue, c. 1984-1989

Jul 24, 2014 / 1 note

"When I came to New York in the ’70s, I was tremendously excited because everywhere— on the subways, posters on walls, graffiti—language was everywhere in this town and I loved that because language was mine. Most of it was advertising something, even the kids who wrote it, but you don’t come to New York if you don’t like advertising and I was definitely pleased. It was and remains a rich experience. Now it’s in the galleries too. I’ve heard people complain they’re sick of standing in galleries reading. I spent the last few weeks doing exactly that, being a poet looking at how visual artists use words in their prints. Often I got to sit down. I brought my coffee and was incredibly careful.

I started with Hannah Wilke at Ronald Feldman. Mark laid the print down on one of those beautiful pieces of furniture with so many thin drawers. I began counting, something I never do when I look at poems. In general, visual artists are more anal about language than poets are. It’s the thingness of words that they’re after and thingness often comes in pieces. Hannah Wilke chose 16 words in 1978, Hannah-Wilke-type words: thank you, archangel, epiphany, orphan, bacchanal, chance, thanatosis, enchantment, etc. You’ll notice that all these words have “h”, “a”, and “n” in them. You might also consider that Hannah’s name is a palindrome, going both ways, SO what she did in a raised grid yielding 16 squares was take each word and line it up six times (Hannah has six letters) with the necessary letter (the “H” in epipHany) capitalized as well, so you get a shape that resembles an arrow or an angel and the diagonal spine of it reads Hannah. The typeface of the whole is like that of a wedding invite, so it’s as if 16 birds flew by 16 windows and cooed someone’s name.”

Eileen Myles, The Importance of Being Iceland, 1993